Skip to content
New developments in the missing plane case... Two investigators tell exciting information!
archive photo

Two senior investigators into the world-shattering Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have said it went missing due to a murder-suicide plot.

Two senior investigators into the world-shattering Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 have said it went missing due to a murder-suicide plot.

During a Sky News MH370: The Final Search documentary, which aired on Tuesday, John Cox, the chief flight safety investigator, a retired pilot, said the loss of MH370 was no accident.

He noted that the plane's tortuous course left no doubt that the flight had been taken over by one of the captains. "I think the evidence is very strong that the plane could not have flown the path it took with all the bends, without this being a controlled maneuver," Cox said.

He added that the flight path could only be taken by a person with expert knowledge and ability, which led him to suspect that the pilot and first officer were responsible for the path of that flight.

Cox said pilot Shah was the only one on board with the knowledge and experience to disable MH370's data link system.

That is why Cox does not believe that the co-pilot, First Officer Fariq Abdul Hamid, had a role in the disappearance.

With the wreckage still undetermined, the fate and cause of the passenger plane's crash remain one of aviation's greatest mysteries.

As Canadian aviation crash investigator Larry Vance said in the documentary, the events leading up to the Malaysia Airlines crash were very simple.

An Australian widow whose husband disappeared on board the ill-fated flight MH370 believes the plane deliberately crashed into the ocean.

Danica Weeks spent years insisting that the Malaysia Airlines flight crashed due to mechanical failure.

Her husband Paul was one of 239 people on the ill-fated flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, which lost contact with airlines shortly after take-off and was never found.
But after a new analysis of satellite data by British aeronautical engineer Richard Godfrey found the plane most likely crashed in the Indian Ocean, Western Australia, the mother-of-two now believes the crash was an act of premeditated murder.

A Malaysia Airlines flight, with 239 people on board, went missing over the Indian Ocean on March 8, 2014.

About 26 countries participated in the 4-year, $200 million international research effort, which covered more than 120,000 square metres.